Pádraic Moran

Lecturer in Classics, University of Galway (Ireland)

Publications

Book

Pádraic Moran, De Origine Scoticae Linguae (O’Mulconry’s Glossary): An early Irish linguistic tract, edited with a related glossary, Irsan, Corpus Christianorum, Lexica Latina Medii 7 Aevi (Turnhout: Brepols, 2019). 592 pp. ISBN: 978-2-503-58179-8.

Reviews:

  1. Alderik Blom, Studia Celtica 54 (2020), 190–192.
  2. Johann Corthals, Zeitschrift für Celtische Philologie 67 (2020) 239–243.
  3. Deborah Hayden, Speculum 95 (2020), 1026–7.
  4. Chantal Kobel, Studia Celtica Fennica 17 (2020–2021), 15–19.
  5. Pierre-Yves Lambert, Études Celtiques 46 (2020), 277–280.
  6. Thomas O’Loughlin, Celtica 32 (2020), 272–274.
  7. Erich Poppe, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 80 (Winter, 2020), 87–90.
  8. Nike Stam, Journal of Medieval Latin 31 (2021), 337–341.
  9. Patrick Wadden, The Medieval Review (TMR) 20.05.23 (2020).

Edited book

Pádraic Moran, Immo Warntjes (eds), Early Medieval Ireland and Europe: Chronology, Contacts, Scholarship. Festschrift for Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 14 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2015)
XXX + 724 pp, 36 b/w ill., 18 b/w tables. ISBN: 978-2-503-55313-9
[Download contents]

Articles and chapters

  1. ‘Irish glossaries and other digital resources for early Irish studies’, in Malte Rehbein & Sean Ryder (eds), Jahrbuch für Computerphilologie 10 (Darmstadt, 2010), 131–49. [Download]
  2. ‘Hebrew in early Irish glossaries’, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 60 (Winter 2010), 1–21. [Download]
  3. ‘ “Their harmless calling”: Stokes and the Irish linguistic tradition’, in Elizabeth Boyle & Paul Russell (eds), The Tripartite Life of Whitley Stokes (1830–1909) (Dublin: Four Courts, 2011), pp 175–84. [Download]
  4. ‘A living speech? The pronunciation of Greek in early medieval Ireland’, Ériu 61 (2011), 29–57. [Download]
  5. ‘Greek in early medieval Ireland’, in Alex Mullen & Patrick James (eds), Multilingualism in the Graeco-Roman Worlds (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012), pp 172–92. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139012775.009 [Download]
  6. ‘High Island and the cult of Saint Féichín in Connemara’, in Georgina Scally (ed.), High Island (Ardoileán), Co. Galway: Excavation of an Early Medieval Monastery, Archaeological Monograph Series 10 (Dublin: Stationary Office, 2014), pp 16–27. [Download draft]
  7. ‘Greek dialectology and the Irish origin story’, in P. Moran & I. Warntjes (eds), Early Medieval Ireland and Europe: Chronology, Contacts, Scholarship. Festschrift for Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 14 (Turnhout: Brepols 2015), pp 481–512.
  8. ‘Language interaction in the St Gall Priscian glosses’, Peritia 26 (2015), 113–42. https://doi.org/10.1484/J.PERIT.5.108317
  9. ‘Irish vernacular origin stories: language, literacy, literature’, in Norbert Kössinger, Elke Krotz, Stephan Müller & Pavlína Rychterová (eds), Anfangsgeschichten / Origin Stories. Der Beginn volkssprachiger Schriftlichkeit in komparatistischer Perspektive / The Rise of Vernacular Literacy in a Comparative Perspective, MittelalterStudien 31 (Munich: Fink, 2018), pp 259–273.
  10. ‘Comparative linguistics in seventh-century Ireland: De origine scoticae linguae’, in Language & History 63/1 (2020), 3–23. https://doi.org/10.1080/17597536.2019.1706129
  11. ‘Classics through Irish at University College, Galway, 1931–1978’, in Isabelle Torrance & Donncha O’Rourke (eds), Classics and Irish Politics 1916–2016 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020), pp 100–124. https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198864486.003.0006
  12. with Síle Ní Mhurchú, ‘Irish translations and editions of Greek and Latin texts and related works (to 1978)’, in Isabelle Torrance & Donncha O’Rourke (ed.), Classics and Irish Politics 1916–2016 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020), pp 125–136.
  13. with John Whitman, ‘Glossing and reading and in western Europe and East Asia: a comparative case study’, Speculum 97 (2022), 112–139. https://doi.org/10.1086/717331
  14. ‘Latin Grammar Crossing Multilingual Zones: St Gall, Stiftsbibliothek, 904’, in Michael Clarke & Máire Ní Mhaonaigh (eds), Medieval Multilingual Manuscripts: Case Studies from Ireland to Japan, Studies in Manuscript Cultures 24. (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2022), pp 35–54. [Open access] https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110776492-003
  15. (in press) ‘A revised typology for the St Gall Priscian glosses’, in Franck Cinato, Aimée Lahaussois and John Whitman (eds), Glossing Practice: Past and Present, West & East (Lanham: Lexington Books, forthcoming).

Digital editions

Editorial and technical work:

  1. Manuscripts with Irish Associations (MIrA) <http://www.mira.ie> (2021)
  2. with B. Bauer, R. Hofman, St Gall Priscian Glosses <http://www.stgallpriscian.ie> (2010, rev. 2017).
  3. with Sharon Arbuthnot, Paul Russell, Early Irish Glossaries Database <https://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/irishglossaries/> (2006, rev. 2009, 2017)

Technical only:

  1. Paul Russell & Alex Mullen, Celtic Personal Names of Roman Britain <https://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/personalnames/> (2007, rev. 2020)
  2. David Stifter, Non-Mediterranean Names in Noricum/Nichtmediterrane Namen in Noricum <https://www.univie.ac.at/austria-celtica/personalnames/> (2011, rev. 2020)

Reviews

  1. Review of Rolf Baumgarten (compiler), Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh (ed.), Electronic Bibliography of Irish Linguistics & Literature, 1942–71 (Dublin, 2004), in Peritia 21 (2010), 357–9
  2. Review of Mariken Teeuwen & Sinéad O’Sullivan (eds), Carolingian Scholarship and Martianus Capella. Ninth-Century Commentary Traditions on De nuptiis in Context (Turnhout, 2011), in Early Medieval Europe 22 (2014), 381–4. https://doi.org/10.1111/emed.12073
  3. Review of Sven Meeder, The Irish Scholarly Presence at St. Gall: Networks of Knowledge in the Early Middle Ages (London, 2018), in Early Medieval Europe 28 (2020), 151–4. https://doi.org/10.1111/emed.12381
  4. Review of Paul Russell, Reading Ovid in Medieval Wales (Ohio, 2017), in Peritia 30 (2019), 305–308. https://doi.org/10.1484/J.PERIT.5.121002
  5. Review of Richard Ashdowne and Carolinne White (eds.), Latin in Medieval Britain (Oxford, 2017), in Speculum 96 (2021), 470–472. https://doi.org/10.1086/713771